Life

Leading, designing and delivering care and services for seniors

Leading, designing and delivering care and services for seniors

Encouraged by qualitative research that shows art may be one of the ways to engage people living with dementia, the University of British Columbia (UBC) and the University of Washington (UW) in Seattle are partnering in a study to explore ways to integrate this new knowledge into large care systems.

Healthy Minds

Healthy Minds

Highlighting ‘what mental health really is’ during Mental Health Week

We often automatically say “fine” when someone at work asks how we are. Yet the same question can trigger a more meaningful exchange – one that acknowledges how we truly feel and whether we reach out when we need support. What are some of the conditions that are conducive to opening up at our place of work on days when we’re not feeling like ourselves?

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Looking ahead to affordable medicines for all Canadians

Looking ahead to affordable medicines for all Canadians

The Canadian life and health insurance industry welcomes the renewed focus on finding a way to ensure that all Canadians can get access to affordable prescription drugs. We strongly support the need for comprehensive reform so that Canadians can have access to medicines and, equally importantly, Canada’s prescription drug system is put back on a secure financial footing for the foreseeable future.

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Aging

Aging

Older adults at risk of experiencing harm related to substance use

When a 24-year-old person walks into a doctor’s office appearing confused, agitated or tired, the physician will know something is amiss and will explore the potential that this person has consumed drugs. But there is a good chance that the same symptoms will not raise red flags for a 74-year-old patient. In addition, an older adult’s dwindling social circle can increase the risk of challenges related to substance use going unnoticed.

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Making reconciliation part of day-to-day life

Making reconciliation  part of day-to-day life

It has been over two years since the Truth and Reconciliation Commission issued its calls to action, but the journey to reconciliation requires perseverance and involves everyone, says Robert Joseph, hereditary chief of the Gwawaenuk First Nation and co-founder of Reconciliation Canada.

More information at reconciliationcanada.ca.

Vaccines

Vaccines

Don’t risk losing your quality of life to a vaccine-preventable disease

As children, about 95 per cent of today’s North American adults endured the itch and misery of chickenpox. And while we may not even remember being sick, we’re still harbouring its cause – the dormant varicella zoster virus – in nerve structures near the spine called the dorsal root ganglia.  

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Commitment to Reconciliation

Commitment to Reconciliation

Moving forward requires honesty about Canada’s collective past and present actions

As Canada enters its 151st year as a nation, the call for healing, reconciliation and justice rings loudly from coast to coast to coast, says Ry Moran, director of the National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation (NCTR) at the University of Manitoba.  

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Climate Change

Climate Change

Business leaders face many questions with the impacts of climate change creating new and emerging operating landscapes.  

Those questions include: Is climate change affecting my business or could it in the future? Could severe weather events occur in places where my organization operates facilities or cause disruptions to my global supply chain? Could government policy responses to climate change to meet targets under the Paris Agreement create new business risks and opportunities?

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Fraud Prevention Month

Fraud Prevention Month

The shame and embarrassment of being caught by a scammer is one of the main reasons why only about five per cent of fraud is reported to the authorities, according to Josephine Palumbo, deputy commissioner of competition, deceptive marketing practices at Canada’s Competition Bureau.  

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Chinese New Year

Chinese New Year

Canadians across the country are invited to join the millions of people who celebrate the beginning of the Year of the Dog on February 16, 2018, with a variety of age-old traditions

It makes sense to start new beginnings with something you love, so when Jen Sookfong Lee wakes up on the morning of the Chinese New Year, she and her son “eat a piece of candy to ensure the coming year is sweet,” she says. “And we greet each other with Gung hay fat choy.”
In exchanging wishes for a prosperous new year – Gung hay fat choy in Cantonese and Gong xi fa cai in Mandarin – Lee joins the millions of people around the world who observe this important celebration, which is rooted in the lunisolar calendar.

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AIRPORTS TARGET SECURITY SCREENING INVESTMENT FOR BUDGET 2019

AIRPORTS TARGET SECURITY SCREENING INVESTMENT FOR BUDGET 2019

The underfunding of government services needed to support strong growth in air traffic is the single biggest issue facing Canadian airport operators, with security screening at the top of the list, says Daniel-Robert Gooch, president of the Canadian Airports Council (CAC).

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Fuelling green growth

Fuelling green growth

In considering the best location to grow produce in Canada, Saint-Félicien, situated at a latitude of 48.65° north and about 280 kilometres north of Quebec City, would not necessarily be the first place to come to mind. Yet the town is now home to the Toundra Greenhouse project, which currently produces some 45 million cucumbers per year and aims to contribute to making Quebec self-sufficient and reduce high-carbon footprint imports.

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At the intersection of technology and insurance

At the intersection of technology and insurance

Rapidly evolving technology and the societal changes it brings carry a number of implications for the insurance industry. New business models, as evident in Uber and Airbnb, are evolving, autonomous cars take to the road, and cyber security risks are proliferating. While challenges continue to crop up alongside technology advancements, they are also sources of valuable tools for day-to-day business operations and can help to identify and track trends, say Doug Grant and Patrick Vice, partners at Insurance-Canada.ca Inc., a Toronto-based organization that provides consumers and insurance professionals with independent information about technology and the business of insurance in Canada.

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Multi-disciplinary team uncovers secrets in the world of fine art

Multi-disciplinary team uncovers secrets in the world of fine art

Dr. Michael D. Noseworthy, professor of electrical and computer engineering and co-director of the McMaster School of Biomedical Engineering, has always loved art. He has visited some of the great art galleries of the world, where he marvelled at the talent, imagination and creativity of the artists. But he never imagined he would be part of a multi-disciplinary team delving into the material condition of nine historical paintings, including a Van Gogh.

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