Innovation

Pixel perfect

Pixel perfect

From the challenge of the next game to potential applications in particle physics, biomechanics, medical imaging and more

The tiniest detail – an oddly drawn plume of smoke or teeth with an unnatural tint – can yank video game players or animated movie audiences out of their states of suspended disbelief.

To view more stories related to this article visit globeandmail.com

Less stress for referees

Less stress for referees

Better support for sports officials includes training with innovative technology

We’ve all been there: at the edge of our seats and engrossed in a game when the referee’s whistle interrupts the action. What comes next could be greeted with cheers or groans, depending on whether the call is in favour of our team or the opposition.

To view more stories related to this article visit globeandmail.com

STEAM EDUCATION

STEAM EDUCATION

Science, technology, engineering and mathematics combine with the arts (STEAM) to prepare youth to thrive in a technology-driven world

It’s been barely two years since the official launch of Canada 2067, but the ambitious 50-year program to promote learning in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) has already gripped the imagination of educators, learners and the business community more firmly than its founders had hoped for.

For more related to this article visit globeandmail.com

Sustainability

Sustainability

Speedier transition needed to achieve clean energy’s full potential
With the world’s population on track to reach 10 billion by 2050, the drive towards a more sustainable global economy has become an imperative. Arguably, few people recognize that imperative more than University of British Columbia (UBC) professor Walter Mérida.

Innovation & Technology

Innovation & Technology

Ushering breakthrough inventions out of the lab and into the market
When the Canadian team Ionomr recently won the Start Up Energy Transition (SET) award in Berlin,  the competition’s congratulatory tweet noted that Ionomr’s “disruptive and revolutionary membrane technology offers to turn the energy world itself upside down.”

For more related to this visit globeandmail.com

Multi-disciplinary team uncovers secrets in the world of fine art

Multi-disciplinary team uncovers secrets in the world of fine art

Dr. Michael D. Noseworthy, professor of electrical and computer engineering and co-director of the McMaster School of Biomedical Engineering, has always loved art. He has visited some of the great art galleries of the world, where he marvelled at the talent, imagination and creativity of the artists. But he never imagined he would be part of a multi-disciplinary team delving into the material condition of nine historical paintings, including a Van Gogh.

To view more related to this article visit globeandmail.com

Built for a carbon-constrained future

Built for a carbon-constrained future

The goal is well defined: to stop the rise of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. With the Canadian government’s commitment to reduce carbon emissions by 30 per cent below 2005 levels by 2030, all emission sources come under scrutiny. Buildings – and the energy use associated with their construction, maintenance and operation – account for about one-third of greenhouse gas emissions in Canada, says Thomas Mueller, president and CEO of the Canada Green Building Council (CaGBC), who believes that efforts to improve the sustainability parameters of buildings need to focus on their carbon footprint.

To view entire report visit globeandmail.com

Insurance sector prepares for wave of new technology

Insurance sector prepares for wave of new technology

It may be 10 years or more before fully autonomous vehicles start rolling out of dealers’ showrooms in large numbers and heading for the open road, but the prospect of a commercially available driverless car in the not-too-distant future has captured the public’s imagination like few technologies have managed to do in recent years.

For more related to this story visit globeandmail.com

Research builds our communities

Research builds our communities

If you listen to Andrew Pelling, you’ll believe your most creative and wild ideas are worth paying attention to. You may even feel compelled to submit them for further investigation in his lab, where biohacking and DIY science are par for the course.  Dr. Pelling leads the Laboratory for Biophysical Manipulation at the University of Ottawa, described on its home page as “an openly curious and exploratory space where scientists, engineers and artists work in close quarters.”

For more related to this story visit globeandmail.com

Researching math through art

Researching math through art

Happy faces, thunder clouds, disembodied heads: These are some of the images produced by K-12 pupils who were asked to draw how they feel when they are doing math. The drawings are part of a research study at the University of Calgary’s Werklund School of Education to understand how personal relationships with math are established and how teachers can improve education to enable students of all ages to better connect with STEM subjects.

To view entire report visit globeandmail.com
 

Supporting charities and gaining carbon credits by extending life of IT assets

Supporting charities and gaining carbon credits by extending life of IT assets

Over the past six years, Green4Good’s unique IT asset-retiring program has diverted more than a million computers, laptops, servers and printers away from landfills, raising more than $2-million for charity in the process. Here’s how it works: Green4Good, a division of Compugen Finance, collects “end-of-first-life” assets from businesses across Canada and transfers them to a secure facility where they are refurbished and loaded with a fully licensed Microsoft operating system prior to resale, often to schools and institutions needing IT assets but faced with financial challenges.

View entire report on globeandmail.com