Chinese New Year

Canadians across the country are invited to join the millions of people who celebrate the beginning of the Year of the Dog on February 16, 2018, with a variety of age-old traditions

It makes sense to start new beginnings with something you love, so when Jen Sookfong Lee wakes up on the morning of the Chinese New Year, she and her son “eat a piece of candy to ensure the coming year is sweet,” she says. “And we greet each other with Gung hay fat choy.”
In exchanging wishes for a prosperous new year – Gung hay fat choy in Cantonese and Gong xi fa cai in Mandarin – Lee joins the millions of people around the world who observe this important celebration, which is rooted in the lunisolar calendar.

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Family-friendly ski slopes

Some of Brad and Tanya Pelletier’s fondest family memories have happened in the snow and cold. Skiing is one of the few activities their clan of six, with kids ranging in age from eight to 15, can enjoy together. So getting on the slopes together is a priority, and Big White Ski Resort is one of their favourite places to ski as a family.

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Fuelling green growth

In considering the best location to grow produce in Canada, Saint-Félicien, situated at a latitude of 48.65° north and about 280 kilometres north of Quebec City, would not necessarily be the first place to come to mind. Yet the town is now home to the Toundra Greenhouse project, which currently produces some 45 million cucumbers per year and aims to contribute to making Quebec self-sufficient and reduce high-carbon footprint imports.

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At the intersection of technology and insurance

Rapidly evolving technology and the societal changes it brings carry a number of implications for the insurance industry. New business models, as evident in Uber and Airbnb, are evolving, autonomous cars take to the road, and cyber security risks are proliferating. While challenges continue to crop up alongside technology advancements, they are also sources of valuable tools for day-to-day business operations and can help to identify and track trends, say Doug Grant and Patrick Vice, partners at Insurance-Canada.ca Inc., a Toronto-based organization that provides consumers and insurance professionals with independent information about technology and the business of insurance in Canada.

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Multi-disciplinary team uncovers secrets in the world of fine art

Dr. Michael D. Noseworthy, professor of electrical and computer engineering and co-director of the McMaster School of Biomedical Engineering, has always loved art. He has visited some of the great art galleries of the world, where he marvelled at the talent, imagination and creativity of the artists. But he never imagined he would be part of a multi-disciplinary team delving into the material condition of nine historical paintings, including a Van Gogh.

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Looking back on 55 years of land conservation

In 1962, a group of naturalists in southern Ontario was alarmed by development activities that they saw encroaching on important habitat for plants and animals. Recognizing that this was not just a local, but a national, issue, they created the Nature Conservancy of Canada (NCC) to acquire and protect land under threat. Fifty-five years later,  NCC reaches from coast to coast to coast and has protected 2.8 million acres (more than 1.1 million hectares) of Canada’s most important natural habitats.

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SKI B.C.

The routine is the same at ski resorts around the world – when the chairlifts and gondolas shut down at the end of the ski day, it marks the beginning of après-ski, that time when people gather to swap stories about their day on the slopes or use the opportunity to sample other cold-season activities.  

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Built for a carbon-constrained future

The goal is well defined: to stop the rise of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. With the Canadian government’s commitment to reduce carbon emissions by 30 per cent below 2005 levels by 2030, all emission sources come under scrutiny. Buildings – and the energy use associated with their construction, maintenance and operation – account for about one-third of greenhouse gas emissions in Canada, says Thomas Mueller, president and CEO of the Canada Green Building Council (CaGBC), who believes that efforts to improve the sustainability parameters of buildings need to focus on their carbon footprint.

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Shining a light on solutions that make a difference in the world

Investigations at the intersection of light and matter can provide answers and solutions in a wide range of fields, including mining, energy, health and life sciences, and advanced manufacturing, especially when researchers have access to the kind of brilliant and highly focused light that is available at the Canadian Light Source (CLS) in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan.  

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